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  • First answer
    January 11, 2013
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    January 12, 2013
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Audio-Technica’s AT875R is designed for video production and broadcast (ENG/EFP) audio acquisition. Audio-Technica’s shortest shotgun microphone, it mounts conveniently on a DV camcorder without adding noticeable heft, and is ideal for use with compact digital cameras. This high-performance microphone offers a narrow acceptance angle of line + gradient design. It also features smooth, natural-sounding on-axis audio quality and excellent off-axis rejection of sound arriving from the sides and rear of mic.
 

What is "Phantom Power"?

What is "Phantom Power"?
\What I really need to know is will the at875r work with a Canon XR10?
If not, is there an adapter or what mic should I use?

Thank you
Jacob
Phantom Power for practical purposes is powering a microphone with its signal cable. Some mic types require power to operate and some don't.

A practical check is to know that you always need to have three outgoing connections to send phantom power out of a recording device (in this case your camera).

XLR has three pins in one plug.
TRS has three separate metal connections on one plug (TRS stands for the three which are tip,ring,sleeve).

Because of this using a simple cable adapter that converts from three pins on the mic end to two connections on the camera side won't work. Obviously one of the three pins isn't connected in the adapter.

A quick check of your owners manual for camera or recording device will tell you if it's capable of outputting phantom power. Look for the ability to switch the phantom power on and off.. most devices that will supply phantom power allow you to turn phantom power off to save battery power.

The important part of your answer is the solution. How do you use a mic that requires phantom power with your camera that does not provide phantom power.
Two ways. First some mics that require phantom power can power themselves with an on-mic battery. Second you can buy an adapter to go between the mic and the camera that provides phantom power. There are many powered adapters available that will do this.

So simple adapter cable no. Phantom power adapter device yes.

So why use phantom power at all? Well the mics that use it are much more sensitive and can pick up fine details in the sound they are recording.
An added bonus is with three wires in the mic cable the signal can be transferred in a way that cancels noise that is picked up by the cable (you aren't an engineer so I won't explain how it works).
If you only use a mic cable that is a few inches long the noise picked up isn't an issue so you can get away with a two wire cable.
Anything longer do yourself a favor. Use the much more capable three wire cable with a phantom powered mic. You get more detailed sound and low noise at the same time.
1 year, 9 months ago
Customer avatar
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videoScout
Canada
 
Audio-Technica’s AT875R is designed for video production and broadcast (ENG/EFP) audio acquisition. Audio-Technica’s shortest shotgun microphone, it mounts conveniently on a DV camcorder without adding noticeable heft, and is ideal for use with compact digital cameras. This high-performance microphone offers a narrow acceptance angle of line + gradient design. It also features smooth, natural-sounding on-axis audio quality and excellent off-axis rejection of sound arriving from the sides and rear of mic.
 

Is the 3 prong XLRM-type just an xlr cable?

I am unsure if my h4n recorder will be compatible with this mic because I am unsure if the 3 prong XLRM-type that this mic has is the same as the XLR input the h4n has. If they are different I can just get an appropriate cable-I just don't know if they are indeed different or if the h4n is abbreviating the term.
yes,
xlr is the connector type. xlrm (male) plugs into xlrf (female). so the connector on the end of the cable is female. the connection on the mic has pins sticking out (male).

you are compatible, only question is does your recorder have phantom power? if it does you are all set. if not make sure you use a self powered mic.
1 year, 9 months ago
Customer avatar
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videoScout
Canada